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Switch from weigh bridge to on-truck weighing

18 March 2013

Netherlands-based Van Rijnsbergen-Liebregts weighs and registers incoming waste containers using RCS PLUS with indicator 3100 from Ravas on a Linde 10 tonne forklift truck.

Van Rijnsbergen-Liebregts rents out waste containers, collects waste and recycles it back into raw materials. Every year some 35,000 tonnes of industrial waste, and construction and demolition waste passes through the Zaltbommel facility.

On peak days, 100 to 125 containers are offloaded and processed. The company also provides storage and handling facilities for construction debris, wood, green waste, cardboard and paper. Waste processing today is subject to ever more strict environmental requirements. Not only do companies like Van Rijnsbergen invest in cleaner installations, they are also obliged to maintain a precise waste flow registration.

The company weighs and registers incoming waste containers using RCS PLUS with indicator 3100 from Ravas on a Linde 10 tonne forklift truck. The system utilises a PDA with UniMobile and UniWin PC-software for registration.

Full waste containers are collected by freight truck and transported to the hub in Zaltbommel. At the hub, the forklift driver uses his PDA handheld terminal to scan the container number for ID, then lifts the container off the freight truck. In the same instant, the scale on the lift truck weighs the container. The UniMobile software on the PDA collects both qualitative information (barcode ID) and quantitative information (weight). It sends weight, client number and waste flow type back to the UniWin PC, where the data set is registered in a central database, processed and reported.

The lift truck empties the container at the disposal site and moves on to offload the next one. This new way of working brings Van Rijnsbergen-Liebregts huge time savings. It used to be that every single container was weighed on a weigh bridge, where the lift truck was often waiting its turn. Now offloading the container, weighing it and registering the data in the computer system is one single process flow.

Part of the total waste flow is already separated by the customer, part is separated at the recycling installation and reworked into raw materials. The residual flow goes to an incinerator that provides electricity and hot water to civilians in the region.

Sometimes the content of a container is not what a customer declared. When that happens the forklift driver uses his PDA to take a photograph of the waste for proof.

The picture becomes part of the data set gathered on the PDA and stored in the database with all the other information.

Managing director Wout van Rijnsbergen says: "Mobile weighing is addictive. Once you have it, you don't want to be without it anymore."
 
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